Health

Stroke

November 24th, 2013 by

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You hear about people having strokes and you may even be able to recognise some signs, but do you know exactly what it is?

A stroke is a potentially deadly condition that occurs when the blood supply is cut off in a part of your brain.

There are two common causes of strokes. Blood clots which prevent blood flow (otherwise cvs pharmacy omaha< known as an ischemic stroke) account for over 80% of all cases. Haemorrhagic strokes are also common. These occur when a weakened blood vessel bursts and causes brain damage.

‘Mini strokes’ (otherwise known as ‘transient ischemic attacks’) occur who is the viagra woman< when blood supply to the brain is temporarily shut off. They often occur as prelude to the real thing, http://healthymaleviagra-formen.com/< so should be taken very seriously.

Strokes are the third largest killer after heart disease and cancer. Due to brain damage caused, they are the most common cause of adult disability in the UK.

So who’s at risk? People over 65 years old are most cialis daily dosage< at risk, but it is not age-discriminative as it is possible for children to be struck too. If you smoke your risk increases dramatically. Being overweight, having high blood pressure and living a sedentary lifestyle puts you further at risk. Stress, poor diet and excessive alcohol intake are further risk factors.

It is a matter of grave medical emergency because the sooner a stroke victim reaches medical attention the less damage is likely to occur. Learn to recognise the signs and if you suspect somebody is having a stroke, phone for an ambulance immediately.

The main symptoms of a stroke can be remembered with the word FAST: Face-Arms-Speech-Time.

Face: A common sign is when the victim’s face has dropped on one side. The person’s mouth and/or eye may have dropped.

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Arms: If they are unable to lift one or both of their arms, this can be a sign. Weakness or numbness in the arms can also be indicative of a stroke.

Speech: This is affected too. Speech can become slurred or may not be possible at all.

‘Time’ represents the paramount emergency – dial 999, without hesitation.

actfast

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Stroke/Pages/Introduction.aspx

One Response to “Stroke”

  • Crystal Wise says:

    I had a stroke at the age of 41 years. I am overweight and diabetic and until March 10, 2012, I was also a smoker. It was that fateful day that I lost the use of my left arm (temporarily) and was advised to go to the emergency room. I actually had the stroke the week before, or so the doctors think but didn’t finish getting all of the symptoms until that day. After days in the hospital the reason was diagnosed-diabetes had caused the blood vessels off of my carotid artery to narrow severely and the smoking caused the clot to form. When the neurologist talked to me in rehab she told me that my brain could not handle one more cigarette. I quit cold turkey and came home to change my habits. I am still overweight and diabetic, I still have no feeling from my left ear down to my left hip (I do have feeling in my arm though), but I am alive and I am working on getting healthy.

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